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      JEE3


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      Post #60935, posted on 12-31-2015 GMT-5 hours    

      ______________________________________

      After nearly (2) years (March 2014) since it's original posting, so much new information has been found on this misunderstood "Jellybean" color, we have decided to do a complete new DKPG chapter with all new images!
      The first big break came when we found a 1967 Portland newspaper article on the new BI servcies and the reporter was describing some of the colors and referred to DKPG as 'Oregon' Green. Our tech adviser realized the connection with the U Of Oregon's Thunder Green and we decided to go with that tone and with the discovery of a key DKPG new photo, were are quite positive that we have the best representation of (Dark) Panagra Green for modelers. Our Eric then created a new N7290 727 profile, as well as a new Chip.
      Just before this posting, we have learned from Ben at Braniff Preservation Group that a letter from Harding Lawrence to the Harper & George Agency tells them they are to include the current Panagra DC-8 colors as part of the new 1967 H & G colors! So now there is no doubt that DKPG and Panagra Yellow are exact copies of the DC-8 colors. Most likely the Light Panagra Green (Chapter #10) is also the same color for the planned new Panagra -62 scheme.

      Though DKPG failed as a long serving "JB" color, it has quite an interesting history, dating back to the 1890's, when the Grace Brothers (William Russell and Michael) got into the shipping business. In 1916 Grace Steamship Lines began passenger services along the west coast of South America. While Michael returned to Ireland, W.R. would remain in New York. In 1929, the airline partnership began with Pan American Airways. By 1969, W.R. sold the Grace Shipping Lines to Presidential Lines, interestingly the same year that the original (5) DKPG painted "JB"s were repainted into Lime Green or New Green (LPG).

      (Glenn Geddis Photo)
      This N7290 scan is the only repeat in our new revised DKPG Chapter. Just a great photo of the newly delivered N7290 727-27, interestingly, N7289-94 (no N7291 Reg # was used) were not QC's. From Chris' recollections, the DKPG developed a 'flat sheen' after a few months in service and it was not an attractive looking A/C after about a year!

      (BFC Coll.)
      This photo, courtesy of Ben (Braniff Preservation Group) is our first new image and shows the newly delivered N7290 in service! The fresh DKPG is obvious as well as the White outlined windows. The color of the photo is a bit washed out but since any DKPG photos are RARE, there was no way we were not going to post it. It would appear as the finish 'flattened', it then became more difficult to see the fuselage titles. All the 727-27/-27C's were delivered with Black only exits. During 1968 most of the 727's did get the added White outer exits.

      (BFC Coll.)
      You may wonder why are we posting this? It's the only known image of N7072 in DKPG! It was recently discovered on a 16mm 1969 film about the airline industry. Unfortunately in their records, Braniff did not differentiate between the (2) Panagra Greens and there were no known photos of this 707-227 in either. We hope to post a better image of N7072's T/O sequence but the BIG news is for modelers, a DKPG 707-227 is now an option.

      (Dave Powers Coll.)
      With DKPG photo being so RARE, we decided to have Eric work his amazing talent to do a few Photoshopped images for us, just to give an overall impression of how the DKPG's looked to hopefully inspire some models. Our friend Dave Powers at 60's antique-airliners.com took this photo on N1545 at MKC in 1966. The A/C was in it's Original Dark Blue (1965) then and was painted in DKPG (1967) before becoming a Lime Green (also an MIA photo!) Eric's creation gives a great impression of this One-11 in fresh DKPG and Chris recalls seeing this N1545 many times in DKPG at his airport (MKC), though when he saw it, the 'flat' sheen had already begun to take hold!

      Our "JB" eyewitness Chris had seen a DKPG at MKC many times (and says it was the worst looking L-188!) but wasn't sure of the Reg# but we have now confirmed that it was N9708C. However with no known photos, we asked Eric to take this Terry Morgan photo of the later Lime Green A/C and give us a DKPG! Chris always said the Electra's never looked that great in the 'Jellybean' scheme but he recalls the DKPG version as one of the worst, especially in it's 'flat' sheen, though we have a fresh recreation here which looks pretty good-IMO!!

      (Daniel Tanner Coll.)
      Though this N1800 1967 JFK image has been around for a while, thanks to Daniel Tanner, we now have what appears to be the original slide posted on Airliners.net. The posted date is September 1967 and we believe it was the first DKPG painted (Feb. 1967?), so N1800's DKPG is about 8-months old and still has a nice gloss finish. The ex-Panagra Srs 33 was sold off in November 1967.

      (MDC)
      We saved the best Eric recreation for Last! Though after 48+ yrs there still are no known photos to show which 'PG" the only -62CF's delivery color was, we are ready say that it's 99% that it was in DKPG!
      We base our conclusions on (2) eyewitness accounts; We found a former Florida resident, who recalls many times seeing a Dark Green BI -62 parked at Miami in 1968-69. We showed him both our DKPG and LPG chips and he said without a doubt, it was the darker Green. They used to call it the 'Jolly Green Giant'! Being parked during the day at Miami fits, as the BI South American DC-8's were based in Miami and those flights usually arrived in the early morning or late evening.
      Our best 'eyewitness' on N1087's color would come from Airline Historian/Author George Cearley Jr. We spoke to him by telephone and he was actually was a passenger on N1807 on a Rio flight. He recalls seeing a large number of chips around the now never used cargo door and he is 99% sure that it was in DKPG. Based on his recollections and the other Miami eyewitness, we feel confident that N1807 was a DKPG delivery.
      Geoffrey Thomas, who runs the DC-8 World Facebook actually found a pair of assembly-line photos of N1807!
      The Tail is fully marked but the fuselage is in a primer Brown! The likely reason for this is that Douglas sold the -62 prototype to SAS in August 1967 and BI's -62CF was to become the 'test' airframe for the October '67 CF certification! It's truly amazing how so many things have conspired to create this 48+ yr mystery......
      We found quite a number of CAB documents which now give us a much clearer picture of how the sole BI -62CF was used. Before N1807 was delivered, Braniff got the CAB to approve 'Cargo-Only' DC-8 flights on the Eastern-BI South American Interchange. The leased Panagra Jet Trader was returned in November '67, as N1807 arrived and it was placed immediately on this new 'Cargo-Only' Interchange. Unfortunately, Eastern was required by the language in the original 1955 SA Interchange to use a similar type A/C for their N.Y. - Miami twice weekly segment. With no DC-8C in the fleet, Eastern had to lease a Jet Trader from Captiol Airways at $60,000 per month! By March 1968, Eastern allowed BI to take over the entire DC-8 'Cargo-Only' route, as they were more interested in Caribbean expansion anyways! The -62CF route was;
      TUES. New York - Panama City - Lima - Panama City - Miami - New York
      WED. New York - Miami - Panama City - Lima - Santiago - Buenos Aires
      THUR. Buenos Aires - Santiago - Lima - Panama City - New York
      N1807's career as a -62CF would only last 2-months though as BI decided it was better to use the -62's performance in passenger service and in December 1967 and BI assigned a pair of 707-327C's to South America for dedicated Cargo service and N1807 was never again used as a CF!

      __________________________________COMMON ERROR PHOTO___________________________________

      (1973-Peter Nicholson Photo/Airport-Data.com)
      Finding DKPG photos is very RARE, so most likely you will find Light Panagra Green photos, as this 1973 photo of ex-BWIA's 727-78 N307BN. This 727 was part of the 'trade' with BWIA, as BI gave up (4) 707-227's for (3) 727-78's which reportedly turned out to be so corroded that Braniff came close to cancelling the deal!

      ________________________________PAINTING YOUR..........707-327C___________________________

      Originally (6) 707-327C's were ordered as part of the larger Boeing 727-100 order ([16] -27C and [4] -27) that was placed in May 1965. (3) 707-327C options were later taken up. The plan was to use the new 707's to replace the 707-227's on the South America routes but the escalating Vietnam War would see several -327C's on the PAC/MAC charters as well as the new Hawaiian routes that were awarded in 1969.

      (Mel Lawrence Photo)
      The classic 'Military' pose associated with the BI 707-327C's would in the MAC charters and this Mel Lawrence photo is a perfect example. The A/C N7099, has the Black/White outlined exits (which began to be applied in January 1968) though the Type II extra jetescape door is outlined in the delivery style Black only. The Type II door was required when the A/C was in a combi configuration, as access to the front door was limited by the upfront cargo though there was a narrow passageway.

      (Renne Dannes-airines-airliners.de)
      Normally after January 1968, the Type II exits were outlined in the double White/Black. When in the combi configuration, a row of seats was removed from in front of the door and BI would have Safety card placards with peel-off stickers when the combi configuration was in use for that particular flight.
      In June 1966, the FAA mandated that airlines clearly mark the doors and emergency exits. Most airlines first used a Black outline but that appeared too disruptive for some color schemes, so many switched to a Gray. For Braniff, the problem was more difficult as the multi-colored fleet presented problems. The black outline was not readily visible on the dark colors like ODB and DKPG, so in early 1968, a White outer outline was added to most but not all A/C. Quite a few light color "JB"s continued with just Black exits until 1969 though on the 707-327C's it appears all had the White/Black during 1968.

      ('aviator727' Flickr Coll)
      This was the best 'belly' shot we could find that shows the paint demarcation line for the -327C's. The early deliveries had the sold color painted from the radome to the front of the landing gear doors but in later deliveries that section was bare-metal, so it's best to check to photos for your particular -327C.
      This Boeing photo shows the major difference between the 707-327C and the DC-8-62 deliveries. While the -62's were painted with White wing panels on both sides, the -327C's had Gray on the bottom panels. In later repaints, BI continued to follow the this variation!

      Another Boeing photo from Terry Morgan's ebay Song-Of-The-Sky site shows a great shot of the White wing panels and engines. In 1971, BI began selling off/leasing the -327C's and began removing then White paint from the engines and wing panels for the new owners.

      (David Charles Lindberg Photo)
      Unique among the BI -327C's was N7104, as it was the longest serving 707-327C with BI and was the only one to have the bare-metal engines in-service. The A/C was used for charters until 1973 and is commonly seen in photos from around the world.

      (Leon Franco Photo/Eddy Gual Smugmug)
      This Mexico January 1968 photo is the 'classic' Jellybean 707-327C!

      (Terry Morgan Coll.)
      This photo of N7102 shows the 'High-Line' bare-metal lower belly demarcation line that was common on the 720 and 707-227's. We have verified 3-4 of the late -327C's with this higher demarcation line.
      ____________________________________"JB" COLOR RATING_________________________________

      ('aviator727' Flickr-1968)

      1) "PASTEL" 1965-66: AVERAGE- 'with the 1966 deliveries of (5) -327C's, the "JB" modeler has a choice of
      (Original) Orange, (Orignal) Dark Blue, Turquoise (no known color photo?) & Lemon Yellow plus the '67
      carried-over Ochre'

      2) "NEW H & G" 1967-71: EXCELLENT- 'this is the best period for "JB" colors on the -327C's, the (4)
      1967 deliveries as well as the many repaints that were to follow make this the best period for
      color choices'

      3) "HIGH-LINE" 1970-71: AVERAGE- 'we can verify 3-4 -327C's with the 'High' demarcation line though
      this variation was more common on the 720 and 707-227'

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      JEE3


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      Post #60965, posted on 01-01-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      Have completed the revised DKPG Chapter #1! We have now the most recent discoveries on the misunderstood "JB" color and with rumored new BI decals coming, we hope our 15-part 'JB-era' Memories series will be an inspiration for some new Braniff 'Jellybean' models!! BIG thanks as always to Eric for his amazing graphic art talents, to our 'tech' adviser who wishes to remain anonymous but is a retried Boeing Engineer and has an amazing skill for researching and finding hard-to-find documents. Our 'eyewitness' Chris of course, who's contributions to this project began in 2011, when we had this crazy idea of trying to post his 'memories' of the "JB" colors and Ben at Braniff Preservation Group has been a big help with verifying many stories 'inside' BI stories, including the 1966 Brown and planned Pink 727's!





      John

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      Post #64985, posted on 11-19-2016 GMT-5 hours    


      Just in time for the holiday season, here's a gift of N1800 in Dark Panagra Green in 1967, with a bonus feature of a gleaming Mohawk 111, both in full sunlight and cloudless skies, a boon for accurate capture of the green. It looks like there is an observation deck atop the terminal building. This is reportedly taken at JFK, but I'm not sure I am making a good mental match with a given terminal building there.

      At first glance I thought this may be the elusive N1807 in Dark Panagra Green, but it was not to be, not that I'm snubbing my nose at the DC8-30!

      No [img] !

      Duncan

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      JEE3


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      Posts: 1079
      Location: Stratford, CT.
      Occupation: Police Officer (retired)
      Age: 61

      Post #65018, posted on 11-23-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      Duncan:

      Nice find!! Always nice to find new 'JB' photos!! I'll try to remove some of the purple tint.....Hard to believe still no early N1807 in color!!! Thanks.....




      John