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      JEE3


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      Post #57275, posted on 03-23-2015 GMT-5 hours    


      __________________________________

      _______________________________BEST OF..............LEMON YELLOW_____________________________

      Our #1 BEST OF comes from the private collection and shows N1548 in January 1966. As we've mentioned before, any early color in-service One-11 photos are RARE, so to see an early Lemon Yellow is special! You will notice that in cloudy conditions the LY was not as bright as our Chip or Eric profile which we created to show the color in full light conditions. This photo also shows the differences in the Dallas paint jobs and the (2) Hurn 'JB' deliveries, N1553 and N1554.

      This photo of the first L-188 to be re-painted in 'JB' colors comes from www.aussieairliners.org and Chris recalls that N9703C first appeared at MKC in the spring-early summer of '66. Most likely it's the only 'JB' Electra w/o outlined exits which makes this photo another RARE photo.

      It appears that neither of the (2) factory delivered LY 727C's ever served on US domestic routes. Dale Redekoop has captured N7271 in Greenland on it's Atlantic-MAC work in 1968, in it's last year of that contract. Without a doubt, the most commonly photographed LY was N7271. 90% of the Lemon Yellow photos online are of this A/C.

      At the opposite end is a truely RARE bird, it's sister LY 727C, N7277! Normally we don't use cropped photos in BEST OF but this Lee Balterman photo is the only known image of N7277 in it's original LY!
      We believe that N7277 was based in South America and that most likely explains it's lack of photos. This A/C appears in a B & W 1974 photo (Chapter 7-Panagra Yellow) and if that date is correct, N7277 was the last in-service 'JB'! Being that the 3rd LY Factory delivery (N7096-707-327C) was on MAC work, it's unlikely that any of the (3) new Lemon Yellows were available for domestic passengers.
      ___________________________________COMMON ERROR PHOTO________________________________

      A great COMMON ERROR photo is this late 1965 N7077 image from Mel Lawrence! I thought I had found a nice BEST OF LY but it's actually an Ochre, as N7077 was never painted Lemon Yellow! If you notice the sky has a greenish tint to it which has taken out some the the "orangish" tone of the Ochre, giving it a more yellow appearance. Just remember to check the background in the photos and you'll usually find what tint is in the photo and how that would effect the A/C color. Chris mentioned that the 2-yellows, Lemon and Panagra were not even close in tone and could never be confused but in photos, a bright PY does quite often look like a Lemon Yellow.
      Eric's 727 profile is showing a brand new A/C in full sun. Unlike other 'pastels' which had durability issues, it appears that the pretty Lemon Yellow was doomed by the Panagra merger and Harper & George's addition of the 'inspired' version of Panagra Yellow. Chris recalls that PY was a nice trim color but on an entire A/C, it looked a bit 'dingy' but the bright Lemon Yellow is fondly remembered by those who actually did see it.....

      _______________________________FANTASY "JB" WIDE-BODIES 1966-70____________________________
      Since this 'JB-era' series is about building a more accurate 'Jellybean' model, we thought a 'Fantasy' section on the Wide-Bodies of the era would be fun to examine. As you'll see there's a range of 'JB's from pure fantasy to 'almost happened'....

      ____________________________________LOCKHEED L500 1967__________________________________

      (BFC Collection)
      The winner of the C-5A Heavy Logistics Support Aircraft contract, was out first with a version for the airlines.
      The original 1966 L500 proposal was essentially the C-5A with the passengers seated above the cargo with the normal front nose hinged opening but after Boeing reconfigured it's C-5A proposal, Lockheed would come back with a more 747-like version.

      Lockheed's original L500 logo was used only very early in the program and they ended up just using the normal Lockheed logo. By 1967, the L500 was a bit more like a normal airliner in the passenger configuration, just LARGER! The 1967 -1 would have 667 passengers on the main level and 130 up in the 2nd lever behind the cockpit. There would be 88 'Siesta' seats, spaced 52in. apart in the rear of the upper deck. There would be (10) galleys, (27) lavatories and (23) hard working flight attendants!
      As late as 1969, one cargo airline did have (4) L500-3's on order for a planned car service route, bringing new autos from the U.S. to Europe but even this idea ended when the that airline ordered the 747C. Airline and airport managers alike had little interest in that large of an airliner and the C-5A was soon to have it's own problems......

      ________________________________McDonnell-Douglas DC-10 1968______________________________

      (Merlin 'Smokey' Safrit Coll.)
      According to Ben (President-Braniff Preservation Group), the DC-10 would have been the likely choice between the two 3-engine wide-bodies. Having just finished up taking the (5) Panagra -62's and ordering (2) more in 1967, it would make sense that MDC had an 'in' at Braniff. MDC came up with an interesting creation on BI's DC-10 engines!

      We can't quite tell from the model if the titles extend mid-way or at the bottom, so we asked Eric to make both versions!
      Interestingly, the only manufacturers ID on any 'JB' was on the Boeing 727's but MDC has made sure on the model to 'DC-10' near the cockpit and the familiar "MDC DC-10" on the back engine. In the end Harding Lawrence decided not to take on the debt for either the DC-10 or Tristar and decided to use higher frequency 727 flights (LGA-ORD-DAL/DFW) against BI's main rival American Airlines.

      _______________________________LOCKHEED L-1011 TRISTAR 1968____________________________

      (BFC-BI 1968 Annual Report)
      Though it appears Braniff was favoring the DC-10, they did give Lockheed a chance to make their sales pitch and BOTH the DC-10 and Tristar were shown in BI's 1968 Annual Report. The airline press in June 1968 was reporting that the next anticipated DC-10/L-1011 orders were expected to come from Northwest Orient, Contiental, National and Braniff, who they were expecting to sign up for (12). The actual BI Tristar model did not have any Lockheed logo on it but we asked Eric to add it, since MDC had their's on!

      We think it fits the scheme perfectly! Lockheed salesmen would continue to try to get BI to sign on and there is a nice 2-Tone L-1011 model and '500' in the 'Ultra' scheme illustration that Jon Proctor was kind enough to send us and we suspect a future "LS" on those! For those planning a 'JB' Fantasy build, it will probably come down to which you prefer as BOTH the DC-10 and Tristar look great as 'Jellybeans'!!

      ____________________________________BOEING 747-127 1968__________________________________

      (BFC Coll.)
      The one that almost was, at least until January 1971! In January, 1968, Braniff ordered a pair of 747's, at a cost of $48 million, including spares. The 747's were ordered to help BI get the trans-pacific route award (U.S. mainland to Hawaii) which they did in 1969. There were plans to use the 747 'Jellybeans' on some U.S. domestic routes, according to BI. For those interested in a 'JB' 747, there actually are (2) Fantasy options. The original illustration, most likely the Boeing proposal, shows the full Black mask and radome. However, thanks to the 1968 Annual Report, we can see the actual Boeing large scale 747 model that was in the Dallas HQ.

      (BFC Coll.)
      It's clear that a change had taken place and that there would be no Black mask or radome! No doubt that BI felt it was just too large, though South African Airways' 747 design proved that it probably would have worked. In the BI merchandise catalog from 1970, we also find that there was no mask on the plastic 747 models that were for sale.

      (BFC Coll.)
      Reportedly, Lime (Light) Green was to be the original 2nd 'JB" 747 but when the 'Braniff Place' 747 scheme was announced in January 1971, the original Dark Panagra Green replaced it and of course was this 2nd 747-127 was cancelled ...........Special thanks to our Eric who not only did his usual excellent 727 profile but did an amazing job with the 'Fantasy' models, not just 'whiting out' the backgrounds on the DC-10 and L500 but adding windows to the L500. His work has clearly turned our series into a much more professional looking presentation than Chris and I ever dreamed of........John

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      Post #62896, posted on 04-28-2016 GMT-5 hours    

      No [img] !

      Duncan

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      JEE3


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      Post #62899, posted on 04-28-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      Nice!! I will send these to Ben at the BI Preservation Group!! We found that LY was one of the most liked by passengers and employees and actually had no real issues as far as degradation. BI wanted Harper & George to include the Panagra Green (Dark & the planned New Green for the -62's) and the Panagra Yellow which was more of a 'mustard' color, so the '65 Lemon Yellow was out! Don't forget to sign your post......

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      Post #62993, posted on 05-02-2016 GMT-5 hours    
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      JEE3 :

      ___________________________________COMMON ERROR PHOTO________________________________

      A great COMMON ERROR photo is this late 1965 N7077 image from Mel Lawrence! I thought I had found a nice BEST OF LY but it's actually an Ochre, as N7077 was never painted Lemon Yellow! If you notice the sky has a greenish tint to it which has taken out some the the "orangish" tone of the Ochre, giving it a more yellow appearance.

      John



      Interestingly... photos of BN's 720s N7079 and N7080 in the 'Jelly Bean' scheme also appear (at least in some photos) to be painted in a color virtually indistinguishable from that seen on N7077...even though '079 and '080, according to records, were (initially) painted Beige (later Orange). They too, like '077, could more or less (in some photos) mistakenly be seen as wearing the LY c/s.

      As for Ochre (according to google images), its hue can vary from a dark yellow to dark beige to golden brown. My thinking is, based on photos, that BN's Ochre 'Jelly Bean' scheme was at the dark yellow end of the Ochre spectrum...which has, in some sources pertaining to BN, been alternatively referred to as Mustard...as in dark yellow mustard...thus easily confused in some photos with the lighter, brighter BN Lemon Yellow.

      All of which is good news for 'close enough is good enough' modelers (like me) when building BN aircraft in the 'Jelly Bean' scheme...unless the original, unfaded BN paint chips can be found...'close enough' based on what few photos are available is altogether 'good enough!"...because no one can prove otherwise! (unless, of course, the colors in photo references used are obviously 'way off')

      Todd
      BJI

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      Post #63010, posted on 05-03-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      The trick on "JB" photos is the background. We tend to go right to the A/C but I learned to take in the background first. Is the sky correct, the tarmac, etc. Half of the "JB" colors we so close that it really is least accurate way to judge the color by photos alone. The above photo's sky is trending green, so that has added a Green tone to the Ochre, giving it a yellow-ish appearance. Always helps if the photo is dated, that way certain colors might be able to be eliminated. Normally BI kept to an 18-24 month repaint program. We never really found repaint done prior to 18 mos. The 1966 Sky Blue 727C's lasted into late 1967.

      John




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      Post #66706, posted on 03-28-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      The pic of 9703C above shows what is apparently the first L188 'jb' paint. The pic is said to be taken at DAL in March 1966. Without door and exit outlines, that is probably accurate.

      The thing is, N9703C was said to be painted in Panagra Yellow. Is the March 1966 shot truly a Lemon Yellow, or is it an early version of the Panagra Yellow shade? It is really hard to tell, since the aircraft lacks the brightness of the best Lemon Yellow captures. It has that slightly white tinge that characterized Panagra Yellow (and for that matter, the revised orange). OTOH, it is hard to believe that Panagra Yellow really had entered the fleet that early. We'd really look for an early 1967 for PY.

      I do have a postcard of N9703C in one of the yellow shades, but I can't find it in my stash right at the moment, so date and details are lacking.

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      Post #66725, posted on 03-29-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Duncan:

      Probably N9730C was repainted in Panagara Yellow in late '67-early '68 and for some reason was not differentiated in the BI records. 1966 would be too early for the new Harper & George colors. March 1967 was the earliest date we could verify for any of the factory-delivered H&G new colors being applied. As you know PY was a copy of the Panagra Yellow which really wasn't a bright color itself, as Lemon Yellow was. Our "JB" eyewitness Chris always said that PY was more of a 'dirty' Yellow......



      John

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      Post #66856, posted on 04-08-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks John.

      I came upon another shot of N9703C, photographer unknown, taken at DAL circa 1966, based on the lack of exit outlines. No doubt the sudden appearance of a pastel Electra got the photographers excited. The skies are overcast, but the yellow is radiant, as we'd expect the lemon yellow to be.

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      Duncan

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      Post #66941, posted on 04-15-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Duncan:

      As far as we could tell, N9703C was the 1st and only L-188 "JB" to not have the outlined exits, as most airlines started applying them in May-June 1966. Lemon Yellow was a popular color within BI and had no 'issues' with fading. Ben (Braniff Preservation Group) found a memo that stated to celebrate the Panagra merger they wanted to add the Panagra Green and Yellow but the DC-8 Panagra Yellow wasn't really a bright Yellow and sadly Lemon Yellow was replaced only due to the merger. The Panagra Yellow never quite caught on as a passenger or employee favorite.




      John

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      Post #67016, posted on 04-23-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks John.

      The Panagra Yellow definitely was not as vibrant as the lemon yellow. By appearances it seems that they added a bit of white, which had the effect of mollifying the tint.

      I don't know if it's my imagination, but the revised orange seemed to do the same thing, although it was never advertised as 'new orange' as far as I know. It just looks a bit whiter and less edgy than the original orange that Girard specified.

      Back to the Electra, BN was really pokey with the L188 repainting, though N9703C was relatively early (I suspect it was due for a check and they had no choice). Braniff management, especially Ed Acker, wanted to unload the Lockheeds, but ended up needing the capacity, something that was not envisioned in late 1965 when the pastels came along. Hence, most of them went into repaint later in the game and got the door outlines.

      It is not widely appreciated that BN had further options for 111s, beyond the original 14. They were not taken up, but had they been, I suspect that L188s would have disappeared without much pastel repainting. I have often wondered if BN looked seriously at the stretched 111-500. It's possible that it was just too range or field limited, especially on hot days, and they took a leap directly to the 727-100, which was very robust.

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      Duncan

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      Post #67040, posted on 04-25-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Duncan:

      From what I understand Harding Lawrence didn't like the One-Elevens and Charles Beard loved them. Once Mr. Harding took over he cancelled the One-Eleven options and went all Boeing. If the One-11 500 had been offered earlier, it's possible Mr. Beard would have been interested. Oddly, the closest the One-Eleven '500' came to U.S. operations was with Aloha, who had '500' options and wanted an early delivery slot, so they could compete with Hawaiian's new 1968 DC-9-31's. BAC wouldn't help out, so Aloha switched to the 737-200's! Thus the '500's were never U.S. certified...



      John

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      Post #67070, posted on 04-27-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      John:

      Interesting info regarding the -500. I had no idea any US airline had looked seriously at that variant, coming as it did towards the end of the decade after the DC-9-31s were well entrenched, and the 737 was actually flying. (A bit of related trivia is that PSA was serious about the Trident in the early 60s).

      The 111 (at least the 200-400 variants) had lower trip costs than the DC-9-30, but I don't know about the -500. These lower costs were one reason USAir flew them for what seemed like forever: they were great for starting new routes when the loads did not justify a 100-seat DC-9-30.

      Back to Aloha, I understand that there were some support issues with BAC and the 111, due no doubt to the distances involved. In retrospect, hooking up with the 737 was probably a blessing.

      Harding Lawrence was quoted in 1971 as saying that the 111s were too small for BN, but perhaps he did not like them for some other reason. He was a 'Boeing man', something I heard more than once from former BN employees when the subject of what BN might have looked like in the 1980s had they survived. The 767 would have been selected over the A310, and no doubt the 757 would have been added, as its high thrust-to-weight would have been perfect for MEX and other Latin destinations.

      No [img] !

      Duncan