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      JEE3


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      Post #56814, posted on 02-19-2015 GMT-5 hours    


      _________________________________
      ______________________________BEST OF..........H & G NEW ORANGE____________________________

      Our #1 BEST OF H & G New Orange comes from the never before posted private collection and shows a 720 -N7079 in a 1970 photo from Seattle! As Chris mentioned, there was very little difference between the '65 Original Orange and the new 1967 Harper & George Orange but in full sunlight there was a deeper tone to the color. By this time in 1970, just about all of the 720's would be in the "High-Line" scheme. While BI did experiment with removing the White engine paint on a least (1) -327C and possibly (2) DC-8-62's, it appears all the 720's would keep their White engines until the new 2-Tone scheme.

      Bob Polaneczky captured a surprisingly RARE photo of N402BN in 1971, as it was nearing 1-yr in service. For some reason in-service 727-227 "JB"s photos are rather difficult to find. N403BN ( H & G Dark Blue) has the most with (3) posted photos and as far as we know this is the only photo on N402BN! When New Orange was named as the color for the first 'JB' 747-127 in 1968, the color did become more popular inside BI. Besides being (1) of the (3) 727-227's, (2) of the (5) -191's from Frontier would be New Orange and there would be (2) DC-8-62's in HGOR, going into the final 'JB' years.

      In 1969, Mel Lawrence took this nice photo of N1544, wearing it's final New Orange re-paint! Had it not been a dated photo, the re-located VOR antanna on the tail (causing the U.S. Flag to be place higher) and the double-outlined exits would give the normal ID clues of it being a 1968+ photo.

      The final BEST OF New Orange comes from our Terry 'Caravellarella's collection and shows N7102, a 1967 delivered H & G New Orange. Interestingly, most of the 707-327C's would not make it to the end of the 'JB' era (September, 1971), as this A/C was sold in March 1971. N7012 would remain in HGOR for all it's time with BI. While the photo is un-dated, we can see it has the double-outlined exits, so it can't be a 1967 photo which would be in just Black outlined exits. As far was we know, there was just (1) -327C with late NMF engines (N7100-H & G New Green-LPG)
      __________________________________COMMON ERROR PHOTO_________________________________

      Here's a great COMMON ERROR example with the same A/C! Manfred Winter's N7102 photo shows a 'ripe-tomato' color that looks like a mix between Red and Orange! This photo is a perfect example an an excellent but off-color photo, as this color never existed! Another clue in this photo is the Gray tint on the tarmac and in the sky. Though most of us will go right to the A/C, be sure to check other things in the photo and usually this will give you a clue on how the A/C color is being effected.

      Eric's N297BN #1 727 profile gives us the final version of the 727-100 'JB's, though only (4) would appear this way and ALL would be the ex-Frontier -191's. It appears that the large bare-metal front tail was not 'official' and was done by the contract painter-most likely F. B. Ayer. From 1969-71, no 'JB' Dallas 727 re-paints had this feature, so that would seem to indicate that this was unofficial or was dropped by BI after the Frontier -191's were delivered. These (4) -191's (N297BN-N298BN-N300BN & N301BN) all had the 'knock-off' "B O E I N G 727" engine decal which had wider spacing than the Boeing factory version and the 'flipped' BI tail logos, using only one-side of the BI tail stencils, so that the Left-side had crooked "BI"s of varying degrees.

      _________________________________"PRETTY IN PINK 727-1966"________________________________

      Thanks to a letter from BI's former President Harding Lawrence to Ben (President Braniff Preservation Group), we can confirm that indeed Pink was a favorite color from the beginning and would remain so, at least into early 1966, as the first 727-162 (the 1st PNA 727) was being completed. According to Mr. Lawrence, " Pink was one of the colors that made the final list but I wanted Braniff to have a masculine feel since the majority of our customers were the male business traveler".
      We were lucky enough to have an actual 1966 Teague Associates 727 Color Scheme profile that they did for Lake Central's planned lease of the 727C prototype but was cancelled. We asked Eric to perform his magic and he did an amazing recreation of how the BI Pink 727 proposal might have looked at a BI management meeting. It turns out that BI created several Safety Cards in 'JB' colors and Ben was kind enough to take a photo of the entire collection. Though all the colors were not done, luckily Pink was and we made a few samples that we believe give an overall 'feel' for the planned Pink 'Jellybean'.

      Bi began using Pink in early 1966 internal memorandum covers, both with Black and White "BI"s.

      The peak period for Pink being 'hinted' in BI Ads seems to have been in the Spring of 1966, just as the first 727 (Pacific Northern's -162) was being completed.


      Braniff supplied their Pink 'BI' logo for this March 1966 manufacturer advertisement, so clearly they wanted to test the reaction to Pink.
      We believe that Pink's fate was determined just as N7282 was soon to be completed in May 1966. Again we turn to the Harding Lawrence 1994 letter to Ben, "We did not want to convey an improper image for our target (male business traveler) customer". We believe that Braniff did give Pink a very serious final consideration but in the end it was determined not to be 'mascluine' enough and Brown was chosen (we have a planned updated Brown 727 story with a flightline photo!) As it turned out Brown, though applied to N7282, was ultimately re-painted to Original Orange before delivery, so maybe Pink could have done better?????
      In hindsight, as Courtline would show, Pink was an acceptable color by 1970 and in 1973 we would get to see the largest Pink A/C! It was not the color that ended Courtline but the '73 OPEC Oil Crisis! Probably Pink as a JB color was too risky in 1966 but for modelers, could make an interesting subject!!!!

      (Airliners International Magazine-Summer 1973)

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      Post #57010, posted on 03-02-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      Very Interesting! The 1966 ad mentions green (which had to be turquoise since there was no true green yet) and an "off-color pink that no one seemed to know anything about". When I first read it I got the impression that he was addressing the short-lived lavender color. Even though the color did not last long, certainly quite a few customers did get to see it before it disappeared. The "lack of knowledge" about that shade (as per the ad) seems to reinforce this. Thank you very much to you and Chris for this excellent series of articles . . .

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      Post #57023, posted on 03-02-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      According to Ben (BI Preservation Group), Periwinkle Blue (Lavender) was dropped in October, before the November '65 "official" start to the Jellybean era, so not that many people did see it and he doesn't believe N7076 ever made scheduled flights in PB but there is at least (1) photo showing it among others at Dallas, so not so sure on that?




      John

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      Post #57028, posted on 03-02-2015 GMT-5 hours    
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      JEE3 :
      According to Ben (BI Preservation Group), Periwinkle Blue (Lavender) was dropped in October, before the November '65 "official" start to the Jellybean era, so not that many people did see it and he doesn't believe N7076 ever made scheduled flights in PB but there is at least (1) photo showing it among others at Dallas, so not so sure on that?

      John

      True! I have seen conflicting information regarding this. Some sources say Lavender was "dropped within a month", while others say February 1966. If "within a month", was it within a month after painting, or after service?

      I fully realize that Ben has access to BI records and respect that. But only to provide contrasting info here . . .

      The Braniff Pages report that N7076 was permanently painted Lavender on Monday Sept. 27, 1965, photographed, then placed into service on Wed. the 29th of the same month on a route which did eventually take it into Mexico City. Strangely, they say it was officially revealed to the press on Sat. Nov. 6, 1965 (after it had been in service for over a month!?)

      The Braniff Pages reported that N7076 was repainted on February 1966 (from Lavender to Dark Blue) due to complaints about the color.

      On the one hand it sounds strange that the jet was not formally introduced to the public until over a month later. But on the other hand, it does not seem likely that it would have been taken out of service for over a month just to preserve the "secret" Solid Color - Braniff did not have a huge fleet of jets at that time and would have needed it. (Same would be true of BAC 1-11 N1544, the second to be permanently painted).

      Since we know that the Gov't. of Mexico had time to complain about the Lavender color, it sounds to me like the ship did see service as intended (albeit briefly), which means enough people saw it to cause a stir which then went up the "chain of command" from airport personnel to the government itself.

      But that is just my speculation. I'm just putting the information out there. I don't know which is more accurate . . .

      Hope this helps. Perhaps we can find out more . . . -Vince