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      JEE3


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      Post #33015, posted on 06-26-2010 GMT-5 hours    
      It would be Braniff International Airway's president Charles E. Beard, an early advocate for the short-haul jet concept, who would be the first to place an order for the new British One-Eleven in October 1961. Braniff was looking for a domestic service jet replacement for the airline's (20) CV-340's and (6) -440's. Had it not been for the CAB's threat of subsidy removals, a number of U.S. airlines, (including Ozark, Frontier, Bonanza & Western) had signed early L-O-I for One-Eleven's. Braniff's order for (6) 203's plus (6) options, was especially significant as it was the first time a U.S. airline had ordered a British design almost off the drawing board! Interestingly, the One-Eleven prototype colors would have been different than either the 1959 delivered L-188's or the 707-220's. It appears that the large sweep of Red was to have been reduced to a thin stripe. In June 1964, when the 1st Braniff One-Eleven "Official" delivery took place, the airline had decided to keep the 1959 '707' scheme for it's new twin-jet. In hindsight, it's easy to forget how the pre-"jellybean" era uniforms looked! The Braniff Airways pilots would only have 1 more year in their single-breasted jackets with the soon-to-be replaced hat badge.
      Despite the "Official" delivery photo-op, the first Braniff, plus (2) British United's, would continue flight trials for another six months.
      In January 1965, the 1st print advertisement introducing the new "One-11" appeared.
      On April 25, 1965, Braniff inaugurated the first truly short-haul jet services in the U.S. The 1st scheduled flight was a multi-stop route from Corpus Christ (Texas)-Minneapolis/St.Paul (Minnesota) via St Louis , Kansas City (Missouri) & Des Moines (Iowa). The longest regularly scheduled sector was Dallas-Washington DC, while the shortest was the 67-mile hop from San Antonio-Austin, Texas. Prior to the delivery of the 1st One-Eleven 203, Braniff placed a follow-on order for another (12) to be delivered in 1966! Braniff's president Charles E. Beard belief in the short-haul jet concept was rewarded, when early load factors for the first few months increased from 48% to 72%! One-Eleven service would grow from 13 to 28 cities in 13 states. Unfortunately, for BAC, in April 1965, Harding L. Lawrence was elected as Braniff's new president. His first move was to implement an "all-Boeing" fleet standardization program. The (12) optioned One-Eleven's were canceled to be re-placed by the Boeing 727 (still pre-"Jellybean"!)
      Despite the BAC disappointment, it would be Harding, (actually his wife's advertising agency) that would create the "End Of The Plain Plane/Jellybean" image in late 1965. The first (12) Braniff One-Elevens were delivered in the original 1959 scheme (N1552) above-being the last).
      On December 8, 1965, N1553 was the 1st "Jellybean" to be delivered from Hurn, wearing Beige. Sadly, N1553 would be lost 8-months later, on the night of August 6, 1966, when the A/C broke-up while attempting to enter a squall line over Nebraska, 38 passengers and 4 crew perished.......
      The "Jellybean" era would turn out to be a 'classic' with it's bright colored aircraft, including the year-old (13) One-Elevens.
      The 1st 727's began arriving in May 1966, with the pilot's now wearing their new double-breasted uniforms!
      Lawrence's plan for an "all-Boeing" fleet never did happen, as Braniff International decided that the Douglas DC-8-62 (from the Panagra merger) better suited the airline and placed additional orders. By the early 1970's, Braniff began to sell off the (14) One-Elevens, ([8] traded for Allegheny's [2] 727-200's in 1972) and (3) being sold to Mohawk prior to the merger. Two One-Eleven's were kept as executive A/C, including N1546. Both would wear the 1971 2-Tone color scheme. Though over-shadowed by the American Airlines order, it was the Braniff International Airways order that helped to give the British One-Eleven it's early success............John3 (Thanks to "Sparky", Peter Black's www.bac1-11.jet co.uk site, www.airlines-airliners.de, www.braniffpages.com, www.stanwing.com, Airliners.net, Bill Demarest/World Of Airline Postcards & www.aussieairliners.org. Photographers: Mel Lawrence).

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      Oli Pfaff


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      Post #33033, posted on 06-27-2010 GMT-5 hours    
      Thank you very much for this informative LS.
      I've got a further question about the early photos, showing the A/C with the prototype's stubby nose and "displaced" wing fences. I always thought this was unique to the prototype itself....
      Does anyone know how long Braniff (and other early operators) retained this unusual layout?
      How many pre-modificated Elevens were delivered?

      Thanks for further details

      Oli

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      Post #33034, posted on 06-27-2010 GMT-5 hours    
      From what I've read, after the prototype (in British United markings) was lost in October 1963, the 1st production A/C (also in BUA colors) became the 'new' prototype and the next (5) production A/C ([4] BUA & [1] Braniff-N1541) were used for the test certification program. In early 1964, the 'new' prototype received the streamlined nose and the more inboard wing fences. The (5) test A/C (including N1541), as well as the next (4) BUA A/C being assembled, retained the original nose and wing fences.
      On July 8, 1964, the sole Braniff A/C, wearing a temporary British registration G-ASUF, was used to transport the Minister of Aviation to France for a meeting on the Concorde project. This was the non-test flight in which the Braniff One-Eleven was flown with it's original round nose and outboard wing fences. The 11th A/C built (BUA) was the first production One-Eleven to have the updated nose and wing fences and this A/C was used as the acceptance airplane for the Air Registration Board and the FAA. After the April 16, 1965 approval, the first updated One-Eleven was delivered to BUA, with Braniff's modified N1541 to follow......John3

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      Braniff2


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      Post #33052, posted on 06-28-2010 GMT-5 hours    
      Hey JEE3,
      A couple of trivial corrections to the above info.

      "The 1st scheduled flight was a multi-stop route from Corpus Christ (Texas)-Minneapolis/St.Paul (Minnesota) via St Louis (Missouri), Kansas City (Kansas) & Des Moines..."

      Kansas City (the airports, MKC & MCI, and 2/3 of the city) are actually in Missouri...not Kansas. Braniff (and other carriers) flight attendants would get glared at by the locals while deplaning if they made/make the post landing announcement "Braniff would like to welcome you Kansas City, Kansas, where the local time..." They take that stuff seriously in KC...LOL!

      Also, N1553 was painted beige....not ochre.
      What a sad story. I have gone to the crash site outside Falls City, Nebraska. Farmers that work that field say they still find small parts of the plane while plowing. I believe they have now erected a small memorial on the site of the crash.

      Great info....I love these LS stories!!

      Braniff2
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      JEE3


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      Post #33055, posted on 06-28-2010 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks for the corrections! I really depend on the members to give 'em a read thru!




      Thanks......John3

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      Oli Pfaff


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      Post #33056, posted on 06-28-2010 GMT-5 hours    
      Thank you very much for this information about early 11s. Didn't know that before.

      Best regards from Frankfurt
      Oli

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      7274ever


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      Post #56686, posted on 02-14-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      Hello Braniff2 and all:

      You mentioned that N1553 was Beige, not Ochre. I've seen two photos of N1553, one taken during its delivery stopover, and one by Jon Proctor shortly before its sad loss. Both were taken with the sun at a low angle, either late or early in the day. Back when ATP slides existed they had a slide of N1553 listed as "Mustard", while Aeromoe reported it as Beige and Orange! While I do not think that it was Orange, it's very hard for me to tell apart Braniff Beige from Ochre in some photos. I checked the accident report but they do not go into color details. I know that N1553 and N1554 were the first and only ones delivered from Hurn in Solid Colors, and I've heard that N1554 was Ochre (as was N1543, N1550, N1552).

      I do not doubt that it was Beige, but I was wondering how you were able to tell the difference? Is there another photo? (no need to post it) Experience? Eyewitness?

      Any help greatly appreciated! Thanks! -Vince

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      Post #56781, posted on 02-17-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi 7274ever,

      The color Ochre and Beige get confused frequently. Photos of the era did not reproduce Ochre accurately...at all. Beige frequently photographs slightly darker than it really was (it was actually a very light tan color.) Ochre, on the other hand frequently photographs as a very dark brown (most common), Medium Yellowish color (sometimes) and occasionally a dark orange. Ochre was in fact a mix of all those colors (a dark orangish-yellow).

      I believe the photographer for the Falls City newspaper had color photos of the wreckage, one shot clearly showing the top of the cockpit black mask and forward windshield and some of the surrounding "color". It was Beige. The only published copies of the photo are in black & white (newspaper).

      Some very sad pictures of the crash sight. One showing what was left of the T-tail sitting in the field upside down.

      Braniff2
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      Post #56784, posted on 02-18-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks for that info. Yes, I did see those newspaper photos recently (in black and white only). Very sad and hard to believe that winds could be strong enough to destroy an airliner - but it happened. Also happened to a Northwest 720 and BOAC 707-400 in the 60's.

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      Jeff Jarvis


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      Post #56786, posted on 02-18-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      7274ever :
      Very sad and hard to believe that winds could be strong enough to destroy an airliner - but it happened.


      Especially considering that those winds came from BEHIND an A/C doing 250Kts.

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Post #56816, posted on 02-19-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      Especially considering that those winds came from BEHIND an A/C doing 250Kts.


      Indeed...These types of storms are common in "tornado alley". The storms that are produced in this part of the country can be EXTREMELY wild.
      I recognized the storm scenario that N1553 flew into...those types of storms are fairly common in in the central US. An Ozark FH227B crew got caught on approach to STL in 1973...with similar results.

      All plane crashes are tragic...but some of the stories out of N1553's demise are absolutely gut-wrenching.

      Braniff2
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      Post #56869, posted on 02-22-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      What happened to all the pics in this thread??

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      Post #56871, posted on 02-22-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      'J', I had to remove them to create file space for new 'Lost Schemes', as we only get a limited amount each. After we finish the JB-series, I plan to go back and use my own Photobucket to update previous "LS" and ad back photos, plus we have many new "LS" planned also. The JB-series has been already a 3-yr project, so the plan has been delayed but hopefully we'll get back to it soon.....




      John

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      Post #56872, posted on 02-23-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      John,
      Please don't delete any photos. If you're running out of room, let me know and I'll do something about it. If you have those photos, please send them to my email address and I'll take care of them. Thanks.

      Regards,
      ahmed |
      --o--o-( )-o--o--

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      Post #56939, posted on 02-26-2015 GMT-5 hours    
      I've been using www.postimg.org for several years and absolutely love it (note the correct spelling in the URL - no "a" in "img". They asked me for $9.95 up front and have never asked for more, and I essentially have almost unlimited space to store images. Unlike PhotoBucket or Flickr, there has NEVER been a bandwidth/usage rate issue with them. And I've never been unable to access my images because their server was down.

      Highly recommended.