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      Challenger350Pilot


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      Post #70112, posted on 05-28-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Hello all;

      Its time for a new airbrush compressor. I would like one that is small, airbrush appropriate, 1/5 HP ideally, with constant run, regulator, and water trap. I live in the very humid southern US, so the water trap is a must. I dont necessarily have a budget, but I also donít want to spend my grandchildren's inheritance!

      Any ideas? Suggestions? Any particular brands that you might prefer?

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      Piedmont


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      Post #70113, posted on 05-28-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      HiChallenger350pilot

      About 8 years ago I bought an Iwata-Medea Studio Series Smart Jet Pro Single Piston Air Compressor. I live in the Atlanta area so I know about the very humid south! This has been a great compressor and I would buy it again. It is a little more $ than some others but for me it has been worth it. Here's a link to a comparison of different Iwata compressors: https://tinyurl.com/ydywu2c9 .

      Have fun modeling!
      Mike
      ATL

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      Jennings


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      Post #70114, posted on 05-28-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Save yourself a LOT of heartache and expense and get a CO2 setup. You'll kick yourself for not having done it years ago. Zero noise, zero moving parts, and no moisture problems EVER. I'd never go back to a compressor for any money.

      You'll spend less for a CO2 setup than you will for a decent compressor.

      J

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      TheFlyingDutchman


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      Post #70117, posted on 05-28-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Can you elaborate on that J? I think of those CO2 cannisters that like to get empty on a sunday morning with all shops closed, or freeze up, and cost Ä10 each. Bought a compressor as soon as my 16-year-old wallet could afford. Are you talking about the same system?

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      dave6376


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      Post #70118, posted on 05-28-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I don't know if they're available in the USA but I use a Sparmax compressor which cost about £50, say around $65. It has a regulator and a water trap. I've found it very reliable and good value for money

      Where I live tends to be cold and damp rather than humid but I added a separate water trap in the air line just to be safe

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      Jennings


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      Post #70119, posted on 05-28-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I have a 20 lb CO2 cylinder purchased at a welding gas supply house. Not sure about European sizes, but mine is about 27Ē (68 cm) tall and 8Ē (20 cm) in diameter. That size tank costs around US $15-20 for a refill, and per US Federal regulations, you get a replacement tank with a fresh inspection when you refill it. That size tank will do many, many models. I paid US $140 for the tank (full of CO2) and around $40 for a regulator (Amazon). Donít let anyone try to tell you you have to have a two-stage regulator for using CO2 with an airbrush. You patently do not.

      Iíve never had any problem with the thing freezing up. Youíre not letting that much gas escape at one time, so the problem is minimal to non-existent at most.

      J



      Quote
      TheFlyingDutchman :
      Can you elaborate on that J? I think of those CO2 cannisters that like to get empty on a sunday morning with all shops closed, or freeze up, and cost Ä10 each. Bought a compressor as soon as my 16-year-old wallet could afford. Are you talking about the same system?


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      Misterblank


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      Post #70120, posted on 05-28-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I have been using a harbor freight oil less airbrush compressor with water trap. Cost me about $50 with a coupon five years ago. I usually donít like buying things from Harbor Freight that contain moving parts but I have had a rare success with this one.

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      MASP


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      Post #70124, posted on 05-29-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I use one with fridge compressor and small cylinder tank. There is one guy here who produces by request.

      https://microjetcompressores.wordpress.com/modelos/

      It fills the tank quite fast and absolutely zero noise.

      It comes with safety valve and pressure regulator.

      Regards!

      Marcelo.

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      Ben Brown


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      Post #70126, posted on 05-29-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I'd be living in fear of running out of CO2 at an inopportune time.

      I've had a Pasche D3000R for several years and love it. It's quiet and has a built-in water trap and regulator. I've never had any condensation problems with it here in steamy North Carolina.

      Ben

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      Jennings


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      Post #70127, posted on 05-29-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      No more chance of running out of CO2 than of a compressor packing it in (it's happened to me twice). A 20# bottle will do a whole lot of models, so you simply keep track of it and get it refilled before it goes empty. No harder than getting to work on time.

      The biggest advantage to CO2 is zero moisture, ever, under any circumstances, period. I've had more paint jobs ruined by splatters of moisture getting through the moisture trap than I care to remember.

      CO2 has zero down sides at all. It amazes me that anyone uses a compressor for building models. I don't know a single person who has converted to CO2 who ever went back to using a compressor.

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      Challenger350Pilot


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      Post #70129, posted on 05-29-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I really appreciate the suggestions and compressor brand recommendations...I'm becoming more and more interested in the CO2 idea. I'm doing some research, and so far I'm liking what I see and hear.

      I do have a couple of questions for Jennings:

      --I live in the deep south, where its hot and humid, and am concerned about the liquid CO2 condensation as it comes out of the tank, through the hose and into the airbrush, and finally out onto the model. I'll store the tank inside, where's the temp is a constant 73 degrees, but the actual spraying will take place in my garage, where it can be hot as blue blazes and so humid you can cut the air with a dull butter knife. I realize that moving CO2 is way drier than moving ambient air; what I am gathering from what you're saying is that the CO2 just has no issue with dispelling the moisture before it hits my model?

      --I'm almost sold on this idea; I like the 10# bottle, fully charged for $91. I'll need a regulator...exactly which one from Amazon do you recommend? I'd prefer a double gauge, showing bottle pressure and regulated pressure to the hose/airbrush.

      --Can I purchase the fittings needed for my braided airbrush hose from Amazon too? Is there a quick release fitting as well?

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      Post #70134, posted on 05-29-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      Challenger350Pilot :
      --I live in the deep south, where its hot and humid, and am concerned about the liquid CO2 condensation as it comes out of the tank, through the hose and into the airbrush, and finally out onto the model. I'll store the tank inside, where's the temp is a constant 73 degrees, but the actual spraying will take place in my garage, where it can be hot as blue blazes and so humid you can cut the air with a dull butter knife. I realize that moving CO2 is way drier than moving ambient air; what I am gathering from what you're saying is that the CO2 just has no issue with dispelling the moisture before it hits my model?


      That doesn't (and cannot) happen. The liquid that's inside the cylinder under pressure becomes gas inside the cylinder when it boils off at the top of the cylinder. It exits the cylinder through the valve and regulator, then into the hose and out the airbrush. There is no (essentially) H2O inside the cylinder, so no H2O can come out the airbrush nozzle. It makes no difference where you store the tank, or what the ambient temperature is (with reason).


      Quote
      Challenger350Pilot :
      --I'm almost sold on this idea; I like the 10# bottle, fully charged for $91. I'll need a regulator...exactly which one from Amazon do you recommend? I'd prefer a double gauge, showing bottle pressure and regulated pressure to the hose/airbrush.


      I'd spend the extra money and get a 20# bottle. You'll be glad you did. It's not that much more money (not double, for sure).

      https://www.amazon.com/Goplus-Pressure-Regulator-Nitrogen-Reducer/dp/B076HM64LH/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1527624810&sr=8-13&keywords=CO2+regulator



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      Challenger350Pilot :
      --Can I purchase the fittings needed for my braided airbrush hose from Amazon too? Is there a quick release fitting as well?



      It's just regular airbrush fittings which you can buy anywhere.

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      Post #70135, posted on 05-29-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      OK you've sold me; I'm going to jump in this deep end and see how it goes. Thanks a ton for the recommendations and directions.

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      Post #70136, posted on 05-29-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      You'll be very happy!

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      Post #70140, posted on 05-29-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I'll second Jennings' recommendation. I switched to CO2 a couple years ago and I've never looked back. I purchased a 10-pound bottle and I have not yet needed to refill it (granted, I only build 4-5 kits per year). The lack of moisture was one of the main reasons I decided to go with CO2, and I've had no issues at all using it to airbrush in the heat and humidity (I'm also in the South).

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      Post #70141, posted on 05-30-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks for your explanation Jennings. That's totally different than I had in mind. What I was talking about is this:
      .
      These cannot be refilled.

      To be honest, I've never heard about the big tanks you're mentioning and I really wouldn't know where to refill that locally. Does the gas escape over time, or can you hook up your airbrush after a year of not using it and still have enough pressure?

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      Challenger350Pilot


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      Post #70142, posted on 05-30-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I'm looking forward to trying this new (to me) approach to airbrushing. Ordered the double regulator valve/gauge from Amazon; when it arrives, I'll head to the Airgas store and purchase the tank, and assure the gauge fits to the tank. Planning to use it this weekend, and I'll report back on how everything goes with my first experience with CO2. Can hardly wait!!

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      Post #70143, posted on 05-30-2018 GMT-5 hours    
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      TheFlyingDutchman :
      Thanks for your explanation Jennings. That's totally different than I had in mind. What I was talking about is this:
      .
      These cannot be refilled.


      That's not CO2. That's just an aerosol can like your deodorant or furniture polish.

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      TheFlyingDutchman :
      To be honest, I've never heard about the big tanks you're mentioning and I really wouldn't know where to refill that locally. Does the gas escape over time, or can you hook up your airbrush after a year of not using it and still have enough pressure?



      Any company that provides welding gasses, or one that supplies home beer brewers can refill your CO2 tank. The gas can't escape as long as you close the tank valve after using it.

      CO2 is stored as a liquid under pressure. When the pressure inside the cylinder is relieved (by opening the valve), the pressure drops slightly, allowing the liquid CO2 to boil off into CO2 gas. The gas then exits the cylinder through the valve and then the regulator (at the flow you set on the regulator valve). Once the tank valve is closed after you're finished, the CO2 boils off to the point that it reaches its equilibrium pressure, and it can no longer continue to boil, so the rest remains in liquid form. As long as the valve is closed, the liquid remains in the cylinder.

      This is exactly the same process that's used to inject CO2 into fountain drinks like Coke and 7-Up that you get in a restaurant.

      Trust me, it works. I've had the same cylinder of CO2 since late 2014, and it's still full (because I've barely used it since).

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      Post #70144, posted on 05-30-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      Challenger350Pilot :
      I'm looking forward to trying this new (to me) approach to airbrushing. Ordered the double regulator valve/gauge from Amazon; when it arrives, I'll head to the Airgas store and purchase the tank, and assure the gauge fits to the tank. Planning to use it this weekend, and I'll report back on how everything goes with my first experience with CO2. Can hardly wait!!



      Don't let them try to talk you into leasing a tank, or tell you that you are required to buy a new tank. Neither is true. Any tank you get is going to meet the same Federally mandated safety standards, whether it's brand new or an old tank that's been tested and recertified.

      I might see if there's a local welding supply house, and not the franchised Airgas. They tend to be cheaper and friendlier.

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      Post #70146, posted on 05-30-2018 GMT-5 hours    
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      Jennings:
      I might see if there's a local welding supply house, and not the franchised Airgas. They tend to be cheaper and friendlier


      I actually did do some shopping and comparing between the local welding supply store and the local brewing supply store. Slightly cheaper, by about $7. So I'm headed to Airgas, which is so much closer to my house...the others are many miles away, and I'd spend the extra in gas just making the round trip. Everybody was friendly. This is Alabama. We're ALL friendly, y'all!

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      Post #70147, posted on 05-30-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Airgas is a franchise, so it will depend on the indiviual store. But the one I went to tried to insist that it was a law that I had to buy a new cylinder, which is patently untrue. The cost was significantly different. They also tried to tell me if I bought a cylinder from them, I could only get it filled by them, which is also patently untrue. And they really pushed leasing the cylinder, which is ridiculously expensive.

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      Post #70157, posted on 05-31-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Yeah agreed on all...they quoted me $91 for the tank, as a purchase. Then every time I refill itíll, be about $12-15.