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      B747FAN


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      Post #68774, posted on 12-04-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      The great classics as Otaki L1011, C-5A Galaxy, Revell DC-8, CV990. Are they loosing value because of Roden. Eastern Express, AA and others ?
      Saw on ebay Revell, Testors, Otaki, Jodel C5s, going for under 50$. myself, I bought a Testors about 3 years ago for "only" 75$, that time a cool bargain.
      An Otaki L1011 on ebay for "buy it now" 75$. Years ago not under 150$.

      I thought, these kits where mainly collector kits, not ment for building, but when i look at the actual prices, these kits where certainly also for builders and they prefer now the cheep and very good kits from Roden (C5, Super VC10)Minicraft DC-8,F-RSIN CV880/990.
      Even the FROC Super VC10 has now payable prices.

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      dave6376


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      Post #68775, posted on 12-04-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Bubbles burst, that's how it is. If you want an in depth explanation of the phenomenon read "Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds" by Charles Mackay, written in 1841 and still the best study of the topic 176 years later.

      I had an Otaki Tristar for a couple of decades which I never got round to building. When the Eastern Express kit was announced and it became clear it was for all practical purposes the Otaki plastic, I put my Otaki kit on eBay and made enough to buy three EE kits. I have no idea why anybody would pay over 100 for a 1/144 airliner kit but I'm not going to refuse their money.

      I'm not sure that Revell DC-8s are all that rare, certainly not the long fuselage version.

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      BruinPrideBand


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      Post #68776, posted on 12-04-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Personally I've never really looked at any model kit as "collectible." To me they are what they are; kits that are meant to be built. To me the entire hobby is the joy and pleasure of doing so. For a long time I would have considered buying an Otaki L-1011 for what they were going for because it was really the only somewhat accurate such kit around. Now, however, the AA kit is far more accurate and is not that much more expensive. Or for 40-50 dollars you can get the EE kit. Similar scenario with the DC-8s. Just my thought.

      Chris

      "Sorry Goose... But it's time to buzz the Tower."

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      the PRIDEbird


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      Post #68777, posted on 12-04-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Still have a FROG Super VCX with lightning on hold.
      Wanted to convert it to LED lightning but after the RODEN kit
      was announced I don't tink I'll ever build it...
      Think I will re-sale it.

      For the OTAKI L10 I remember I've paid 75,- or something like that.
      Some really old and (previously) rare kits appear again
      e.g. HAWK Comet with interior, LINDBERG CRV with interior...

      Sven

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      insureart


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      Post #68778, posted on 12-04-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      If you are a collector( as opposed to an investor)) It shouldn't matter what has come after. ! I have gone up and down on kits that I personally loved. The newer issues of kits that were considered classics are simply updated to current standards of engineering.
      Two separate classes of kits as I see it.

      I will continually seek the original issues, regardless of authenticity. That is my collector ideal. Am I confusing idioms ?

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      NX28388


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      Post #68779, posted on 12-04-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      In my younger and less seasoned days I tried getting into the Starting Lineup figure trade, hoping to make a few bucks buying up the ones I could find for cheap and flipping them at a profit. All I got for it was a box full of figures of players I wasn't engaged by, still in their packaging, still in a big box 20 years later and I probably can't even give them away now. Out of that came a lesson that I've heard many a wise collector state: buy things not because of their potential value, but because they are things you enjoy owning. Even if you can't make a buck off it, you will enjoy owning it for its own sake, and that has a value beyond dollars and cents. There are certain older kits I will pay a little extra for because they have deep sentimental value to me, and there are also a few kits I have in the stash that I don't intend to build because I like them as they are. If I decide to sell them someday and can make a few bucks, that would be nice, but in a way the owning is its own reward.

      As for kits like the Otaki TriStar and Galaxy, they were highly valued for so long because they were either the only game in town or the only kit that looked close to the real thing, and the tooling has disappeared. To me, neither the TriStar nor the Galaxy were worth what I was seeing them sell for on the auction sites; the TriStar is nice but far from perfect, and I found the Galaxy kit a little too simple and generally underwhelming. Both have been overdue for replacement; Roden's kit is pricey but appears to be very nicely detailed, and while the Eastern Express TriStar has the Otaki kit in its DNA, it does put a reasonably accurate plastic TriStar within the reach of more modelers.

      In short, buy what you like because you like it and I guarantee you'll never go wrong.

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

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      Challenger350Pilot


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      Post #68780, posted on 12-05-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      NX28388 :
      In my younger and less seasoned days I tried getting into the Starting Lineup figure trade, hoping to make a few bucks buying up the ones I could find for cheap and flipping them at a profit. All I got for it was a box full of figures of players I wasn't engaged by, still in their packaging, still in a big box 20 years later and I probably can't even give them away now. Out of that came a lesson that I've heard many a wise collector state: buy things not because of their potential value, but because they are things you enjoy owning. Even if you can't make a buck off it, you will enjoy owning it for its own sake, and that has a value beyond dollars and cents. There are certain older kits I will pay a little extra for because they have deep sentimental value to me, and there are also a few kits I have in the stash that I don't intend to build because I like them as they are. If I decide to sell them someday and can make a few bucks, that would be nice, but in a way the owning is its own reward.

      As for kits like the Otaki TriStar and Galaxy, they were highly valued for so long because they were either the only game in town or the only kit that looked close to the real thing, and the tooling has disappeared. To me, neither the TriStar nor the Galaxy were worth what I was seeing them sell for on the auction sites; the TriStar is nice but far from perfect, and I found the Galaxy kit a little too simple and generally underwhelming. Both have been overdue for replacement; Roden's kit is pricey but appears to be very nicely detailed, and while the Eastern Express TriStar has the Otaki kit in its DNA, it does put a reasonably accurate plastic TriStar within the reach of more modelers.

      In short, buy what you like because you like it and I guarantee you'll never go wrong.

      Jodie Peeler



      HERE! HERE! Well said, Jodie! Agreed on all points. Someone has said it before on the forums, many times, "this is just a hobby, for the sheer joy..." of owning, building, collecting, or re-selling, or just looking at the stacks of acquired kits that may never be assembled. The REAL value is in the heart of the owner.

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      Seven-Two Fan


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      Post #68781, posted on 12-05-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      NX28388 :
      In my younger and less seasoned days I tried getting into the Starting Lineup figure trade, hoping to make a few bucks buying up the ones I could find for cheap and flipping them at a profit. All I got for it was a box full of figures of players I wasn't engaged by, still in their packaging, still in a big box 20 years later and I probably can't even give them away now. Out of that came a lesson that I've heard many a wise collector state: buy things not because of their potential value, but because they are things you enjoy owning. Even if you can't make a buck off it, you will enjoy owning it for its own sake, and that has a value beyond dollars and cents. There are certain older kits I will pay a little extra for because they have deep sentimental value to me, and there are also a few kits I have in the stash that I don't intend to build because I like them as they are. If I decide to sell them someday and can make a few bucks, that would be nice, but in a way the owning is its own reward.

      As for kits like the Otaki TriStar and Galaxy, they were highly valued for so long because they were either the only game in town or the only kit that looked close to the real thing, and the tooling has disappeared. To me, neither the TriStar nor the Galaxy were worth what I was seeing them sell for on the auction sites; the TriStar is nice but far from perfect, and I found the Galaxy kit a little too simple and generally underwhelming. Both have been overdue for replacement; Roden's kit is pricey but appears to be very nicely detailed, and while the Eastern Express TriStar has the Otaki kit in its DNA, it does put a reasonably accurate plastic TriStar within the reach of more modelers.

      In short, buy what you like because you like it and I guarantee you'll never go wrong.

      Jodie Peeler



      Amen, Jodie!

      Andy