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      AW31940K


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      Post #68575, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      I was looking at some pics on the web and found an Airfix
      737-200 in the Southwest scheme. There was one built up and
      the nose looked to pointy to me. Is it? Are there any other
      major goofs on this kit? I'd like to do that scheme sometime.
      Thanks---John

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      NX28388


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      Post #68577, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      For the most part the Airfix 737 is a good representation of the real aircraft. The kit's tooling is not much younger than the first-generation 737 itself (Scalemates has the initial Lufthansa issue as 1969). Happily, like its DC-9 the 737 is one of Airfix's better airliner kits and has held up reasonably well, and it's still an easy build. There have also been a ton of decals released for this kit over the years.

      The radome and windscreen shape aren't the best they could be, but there are fixes (on my Boeing narrowbody kits with goofy cockpit issues I like to cast copies of the Minicraft 737 cockpit cab and replace the troubling areas with that). The main gear well is molded with a false bottom that has a plate that fits over it to give the illusion of a well, but it isn't hard to cut the false bottom out, build in a proper well with bulkheads, and then glue the plate with the wheel openings over it, and you're done. Some people have noted issues with the engine shape but for most applications it hasn't been sufficient to put me off the kit.

      The Airfix 737 isn't an Authentic Airliners kit in terms of accuracy, but so far as "major goofs" I'm hard-pressed think of any. It's easier for me to think of all the really nice builds I've seen from this kit over the years. If you can fix the nose and the soft cockpit cab, and fix the gear well issue if that bothers you, application of modeling skill should take you the rest of the way.

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

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      lichtjahre


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      Post #68578, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi John,
      as Jodie pointed at, you cant get closer to the real thing as having an Authentic Airliner 737, here the -100 built by Kurt, he has the -200 available as well.

      https://www.authentic-airliners.de/epages/64205758.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/64205758/Products/K144-03



      Cheers,
      Christian

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      Ben Brown


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      Post #68579, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      I think the Airfix engine length might have been based on the early version, with the 727-style reversers. There was a thread over on Britmodeller where a modeler (Viking) fixed the engines and cockpit area, but sadly, the photos were lost in The Great Photobucket Debacle. He added a spare cockpit part from the Daco 737 kit to fix that area and added a 4 mm splice to the engines, just forward of the reversers. These two fixes really helped the looks of the model.

      Note that the Airfix engines have the early pylons, and require some modification to build the 737Advanced version. Braz makes some Advanced engines, but they have major shape problems, both in length and in some of the details.

      What I've been doing to get a decent 737-200 is to use Authentic Airliners' engines (unfortunately not available separately right now) to convert the Daco 737-300 kit. It's slightly cheaper than the full AA kit and takes about as much work as it takes to clean up the Airfix kit. That said, Viking's fixes helped the Airfix kit so much that I'm planning to try a couple, just for fun.

      Cheers!

      Ben

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      Post #68581, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      NX28388 :
      Quote
      lichtjahre :
      as Jodie pointed at, you cant get closer to the real thing as having an Authentic Airliner 737



      While I heartily agree that Kurt's is an excellent kit (and while I referenced Kurt's as the best available), the broader point behind what I wrote was to assure John that the Airfix 737 will build into a nice model with a little work. I dearly love Kurt's kits and own several, but they're not within everyone's budget, and their availability can vary.

      Sometimes you just want to build a plastic kit that's commonly available, and I wanted to let John know the Airfix 737 wasn't a bad choice.

      Jodie Peeler


      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

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      Post #68582, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks to all, I don't have tons of money, especially now
      that I am officially on Uncle Sam's fixed income budget plan
      aka retirement,and I am not a big resin fan either, am a cancer
      survivor and don't feel like pushing my luck. Ben, I see that
      article over at Brit Modeler and the Photo Bucket non picture
      pictures. I don't care for peek a boo options of open doors and hatches
      but I have plenty of Tamiya putty and can live with the windows as the
      kit's decals should fit them. Does Airfix give you a cockpit windscreen
      decal? I guess there are plenty out there in after market. Thanks---John

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      Post #68584, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      AW31940K :
      Does Airfix give you a cockpit windscreen
      decal? I guess there are plenty out there in after market. Thanks---John



      You get cabin windows but no cockpit windscreen decal on the Airfix kit sheet, but they are not hard to find (and I wouldn't be surprised if someone will offer you one from their spares box for the cost of an envelope). If you really want to go all-out, Avigraphics sheet AG4093 is a very nice, comprehensive sheet of 737 detail decals with just about anything you'd need.

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

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      Post #68586, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Thank you for the information. That's what I am looking for is what's
      out there and who sells it. I have also in the past 10 years expanded
      my horizons by trying some scratch building. You wouldn't believe what
      you can conjure up from stretched sprue and plastic sheet stock.---John

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      Post #68588, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      AW31940K :
      I have also in the past 10 years expanded
      my horizons by trying some scratch building. You wouldn't believe what
      you can conjure up from stretched sprue and plastic sheet stock.---John



      You are a modeler after my own heart. As Smokey Yunick would say, "It didn't say you couldn't."

      If that 737 detail sheet is of interest, Greg Joy lists it on his site but it appears to be out of stock:
      http://joydecals.com/1-144-scale-decal-detail-sheet-737/

      Nazca Decals does another:
      http://www.nazca-decals.com/html/b737-200.htm
      Greg Joy has it here:
      http://joydecals.com/1-144-scale-decal-detail-sheet-737-200/

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

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      dave6376


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      Post #68592, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      Ben Brown :
      I think the Airfix engine length might have been based on the early version, with the 727-style reversers. ...



      I don't think so. The "727 style" engines only featured on the very early 737-100s. As far as I know the Airfix engines are a reasonably accurate representation of the engines fitted to the early -200s before the Adv version was produced. Built straight from the box the Airfix kit is a decent replica of the very early 737-200.

      Ben Brown refers to the models built by John "Viking" Stokes and posted on Britmodeller. I supplied Viking with the spare DACO cockpit sections he used and I followed his builds with interest. Viking converted the Airfix kit to the later "Adv" standard which requires major modification to the engines and a few other small changes.

      Don't waste your money on the BraZ engines. If you're building the -200 Adv it's less trouble to stretch the Airfix engines and modify the pylons than it is to try to make the BraZ engines accurate.

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      Post #68595, posted on 11-16-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks, it can't be any harder to stretch the engines as I have had practice
      when I unstretched this Revell ERJ 195 to a 190, yeah then Revell issues a 190!---John

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      Ken Miller


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      Post #68601, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      A little bit of a dissenting opinion on the Braz JT8D engines. I thought they looked pretty good. I built an Aloha 732QC using them. Granted I haven't measured or compared them with the real thing. The pylons definitely looked more like Advanced ones than the standard Airfix engines.
      At the time the word was to fill in the third? rudder hinge and use the Braz engines if one wanted to build a 732 Advanced.

      My advice would be to check the registration you wanted to build for a Southwest jet. Build it OOB if not an advanced, and use the Braz engines and fill in the rudder hinge if it is an Advanced.

      Your Mileage May Vary......

      Have fun.

      Ken

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      Post #68603, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Here is a comparison of the Airfix, Braz, and Authentic Airliners engines. Sorry for the poor quality of the photo.


      The Braz engines are pretty much the same length as the Airfix engines, while the AA engines are 4 mm longer. The fairings for the reverser actuators are separate pieces in the Braz set.

      Cheers!

      Ben

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      Post #68604, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Ben thanks, and don't feel sorry for Airfix's poor quality!---John

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      Post #68605, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Oops! I should have said "... of the photo." Edited.

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      Post #68608, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      dave6376 :



      I don't think so. The "727 style" engines only featured on the very early 737-100s.



      And some early -200 deliveries such as Britannia Airways.

      Dave

      Dave

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      Post #68609, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      What's a 737-H4? Is that a particular Airlines number such as Southwest?
      I am use to seeing 737-400 or 737-800 etc. Thanks---John

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      Post #68610, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
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      AW31940K :
      What's a 737-H4? Is that a particular Airlines number such as Southwest?
      I am use to seeing 737-400 or 737-800 etc. Thanks---John



      That's a customer code. For aircraft built for Southwest you'd see "737-2H4" or 737-7H4," meaning, respectively, a -200 or a -700 built to Southwest's specifications. IIRC, Boeing has discontinued the practice.

      Here's a list:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Boeing_customer_codes

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

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      Jennings


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      Post #68611, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      All 737-100 and -200 delivered up through (IIRC) approximately June of 1969 had the short nacelles and bucket thrust reversers.

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      Post #68613, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Just a bit off topic...... I have seen pics of Southwest Airlines B-727 ships representing the time before standardization to the 737. Looking at the Ochre, Red, Orange Southwest scheme of the Airfix issue of the 737 -200, I was wondering if a 727 would be appropriate in those colors.

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      Post #68615, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      insureart :
      Just a bit off topic...... I have seen pics of Southwest Airlines B-727 ships representing the time before standardization to the 737. Looking at the Ochre, Red, Orange Southwest scheme of the Airfix issue of the 737 -200, I was wondering if a 727 would be appropriate in those colors.



      The two instances when the 727 became part of the fleet had to do with an antitrust settlement (when Braniff leased one 727 to Southwest from 1979-80) and, in the other instance, to add capacity until the airline could get enough 737s to cover route expansion on California routes. I don't know if Southwest ever seriously considered adding the 727 to the fleet, but given how committed it was to the 737 at that point (and given how good a fit the 737 was for what Southwest was doing), it's probably just as well it was a one-off.

      The one that was leased from Braniff in 1979-1980, N406BN, wore the ochre scheme and had unique script-style titles. The six aircraft leased from People Express in 1983-85 wore the standard Southwest colors of the day. There's a few photos of each type on the usual photo sites.

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

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      Post #68616, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      I saw that 727 scheme and actually considered it. Back when I bought the
      Revell kit, I like Southwest and the 727, coulda killed 2 birds with one
      stone! Actually I am trying to build liveries I have flown on, Eastern
      L-1011, American MD-80, America West A319, Song 757, Jet Blue A320, Jet Blue
      ERJ190 and Southwest 737---am not sure of the 737 type, I flew from Manchester
      NH to Orlando Fl in 2007 and I am thinking it was 737-300 or 737-500 and I don't
      remember winglets. So far the only one modeled is the American Airlines MD-80,
      I keep seeing others I like....not helping my cause.---John


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      Post #68618, posted on 11-17-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks Ben for posting the photo of the Airfix, Braz, and Authentic Airliners engines. I've asked before whether the Airfix or Braz diameters were more accurate and based on the three I'd say the Airfix is too narrow. Like an airliners three inertial navigational systems. Two have to agree so the Airfix engine is "on it's own". Someone really does need to find an 737-200 and take a tape measure around the engine cowl and compare the size to the model engines :-)

      As to Southwest and customer codes my family has been busy flying Southwest this week. One plane was delivered to China Eastern leased by ILFC. Another was leased by GECAS and first flown by WestJet.

      So Southwest flies planes with "all different" customer codes.

      Ken

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      Post #68624, posted on 11-18-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Indeed. WN always seems to be looking worldwide for 700s in decent condition.

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      Post #68646, posted on 11-19-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      halcyondave :
      Quote
      dave6376 :



      I don't think so. The "727 style" engines only featured on the very early 737-100s.



      And some early -200 deliveries such as Britannia Airways.

      Dave



      Thanks for that. I stand corrected I've just double-checked the Crowood Aviation Series book on the 737 and on p57 there is picture of G-AVRL with the "727 style" engines. Not sure how I missed that but 26 Decals do the early Britannia scheme and it would make an interesting project at some future date.

      By the way I've just received an e-mail to tell me that Authentic Airliners have the 737 Adv engines back in stock for anyone who wants them. They really are beautiful.

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      Post #68648, posted on 11-19-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      A little off subject but I found a picture of a Southwest plane I flew on in
      2008 from Boston to Orlando. I only have the rear half showing the registration
      number N233LV. Is there a site I can go to to find what model 737 this is? Thanks---John

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      Post #68649, posted on 11-19-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      I Googled the registration....N233LV.

      Flightaware came up first.....https://flightaware.com/resources/registration/N233LV


      Shows that it was registered June 2, 2006. Splitting hairs but I believe that the model is a 737-700. The customer code is 7H4 showing that it was built to Southwest's specifications for the airline.

      Ken

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      Post #68650, posted on 11-19-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks, now to find 737-700 Canyon Blue decals. Does Revell
      do a 1/144 dash 700?---John

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      Post #68653, posted on 11-20-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      AW31940K :
      Thanks, now to find 737-700 Canyon Blue decals. Does Revell
      do a 1/144 dash 700?---John



      No they don't but it's an easy conversion from the 738. I believe Zvezda may have a -700 in the pipeline but I don't know when it's due for release.

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      Post #68659, posted on 11-20-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks, I'll wait for the -700. I am finishing up my conversion from ERJ-195 to
      an ERJ-190 and Revell comes out with one! I filled and sanded those splices more
      times than I care to think about! I'll sit this one out and wait.---John