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      pacmintrader


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      Post #65761, posted on 01-28-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Anyone have advice on spray - guns / air brushes?

      I have a 1/100 scale model that is about 25 inches long and maybe 6 inches in diameter. (A Pacmin A300.)

      I want to repaint it, but not sure what type of equipment to use. I am guessing that a paint brush is too small for the job. So I was looking at something like this:

      DeVilbiss 802405 StartingLine HVLP Detail and Touch-Up Gravity Spray Gun

      It holds 8.5 oz of paint.

      Does anyone know how much paint it would take to paint the whole fuselage of a typical 1/100 scale wide body like this?

      Also, I was kind of hoping to use this as a spray gun for other projects around the house, like repainting trim work, my front door, etc.

      Do you think this is a good way to go -- equipment wise? Will it produce a good, smooth finish? Too big? too small?

      Thanks.

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      Jennings


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      Post #65764, posted on 01-28-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Why not just use spray cans (I detest the term "rattle can")? You can get a great finish with them on something that big, and it's a lot cheaper than buying a new brush for doing it.

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      FLYHY


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      Post #65768, posted on 01-28-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      I agree with Jennings - a can of spray paint is the way to go unless you need a unique color scheme. Not sure how much detail you are looking at doing, but have you thought about contacting PacMin to redo the model?

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      DanaK


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      Post #65770, posted on 01-28-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Another inexpensive option is the Preval spray system, which allows one to use any color they like. Basically, it's an empty jar with an aerosol cylinder and siphon atop it. Available at paint and hardware stores. I once refinished the entire rear end of a VW beetle with a few of these. I bought a quart of matching lacquer and a gallon of thinner at the auto paint store, and voila!

      Should you decide to go the spray gun route, check out Harbor Freight. Their guns are a whole lot cheaper than the Devilbiss or Binks models. Compressors are cheap there, too.

      -Dana

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      Team 4R


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      Post #65773, posted on 01-28-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      An HVLP does seem overkill for this task, and that is a lot of area for an airbrush to tackle. I agree: Hit it with a spray can. The quality of spray paints available these days from Home Depot or the like is amazing... Especially those designed to be used on plastics.

      Andrew

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      pacmintrader


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      Post #65785, posted on 01-29-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi. Thank you for your responses.

      In relation to spray cans....I sort of want to invest in a good spray gun that I can use on models as well as around the house.

      However, now I am wondering about a compressor. Yes, I could google this...but "Do I need one?"..I am just so pressed for time...even as I write this, I am working on work....waiting for a server restart (its not always like this though).

      I have this one, which I use for my nail gun (to install baseboards, repair cabinets, etc.)
      6 Gal. 150 PSI Portable Air Compressor

      Is this going to be sufficient for a spray gun or an HVLP sprayer?

      I like the idea of Preval...I have seen a friend of mine use it to repaint door jambs on an auto restoration. I will probably end up getting that as it is inexpensive and better than brushing, and not as complicated as an airbrush system. Perfect for smaller jobs.

      ...but when it comes to models...these are pretty big. I know Pacmin and Atlantic models use these type of guns, or at least I think they do. Does anyone know what they use?

      Pacmin will not restore my model for me. They only work with companies, not individuals. As for Atlantic, they are great! They have restored several models. However, its expensive and takes a long time. Its worth the wait and price, because they do a great job. However, I would like to do couple on my own.

      The surface area of these models, does not seem to lend itself to being amenable to air brush system. The airbrush cups hold about 1 oz of paint. Correct? That doesn't seem like it is enough to cover the entire surface area of a 1/100 scale A300?

      That is why I am wondering about going to the next level? Is HVLP the next step up from an airbrush?

      ...and what about the air compressor? Is the one that I already have going to be sufficient?

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      Jennings


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      Post #65786, posted on 01-29-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      On models as well as around the house? I'd say those are competing interests. If you want an airbrush you probably won't find much use for it around the house. If you want a paint sprayer, you probably won't find much use for it in modeling. They're totally different pieces of equipment.

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      BruinPrideBand


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      Post #65788, posted on 01-29-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      I'll mirror what Jennings said. The types of spray guns you are talking about have a spray pattern that is simply far too large to be very effective in modeling.

      Chris

      "Sorry Goose... But it's time to buzz the Tower."

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      DanaK


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      Post #65789, posted on 01-29-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      The compressor you have is ample for use with either an airbrush or a touch-up gun. I have a similar one, and it's quite handy. I have a touch-up spray gun that I've used for many years for painting both larger models and panel refinishing on cars. As far as capacity of airbrushes, the single-action Paasche H model can be used with a large detachable spray bottle or a small paint cup. I've used my H, for over 40 years, for painting most of my 1/144, 1/100, and 1/72 airliner models, plus it, along with a small touch-up gun, handled most of my spraying jobs when I was a professional model maker.

      -Dana

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      pacmintrader


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      Post #65791, posted on 01-29-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks. That's kind of what I needed to hear; i.e. I can't use one spray gun for both jobs.

      It sounds like I have my air compressor, though!

      Now, I need to pick out an air brush. (I can use the Preval for household items, like my front door and base boards -- great idea!).

      Now, the only question is about paint capacity....1 oz. cups do not seem like they would work for my 1/100 A300.

      I suppose there are accessories, like a cup with large capacity? When I was a kid, I did a 1/48 scale Tomcat with maybe a 1oz bottle of Testor's Gull Gray....but my A300 is probably has about 4 times the surface area..so, I don't see the 1 oz. cup lasting a full paint session.

      I suppose the solution is to mix up a batch of paint in a separate cup, and transfer it 1 oz at a time...Is that what you would do?...

      That sounds kinds of shaky?...because isn't the air brush's cup supposed to be big enough to last for the duration of the of painting session? If I have to stop and replenish, the restart, it sound like it would lead to inconsistencies in the finished paint job?

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      Jennings


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      Post #65793, posted on 01-29-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Here's a radical idea: refill the paint cup

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      pacmintrader


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      Post #65811, posted on 01-30-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      I was wondering about that. Is that the proper way to do it?

      I haven't done this in 30 years...and I don't know what is what...I just know that I want some models restored and I can't keep asking Atlantic Models to restore them, because it is just too expensive and it takes a long time.

      Apart from that, I would like to add extra details and basically...do it my way -- like adding details here and there (especially on the wings and engines). However, I want the result to to be indistinguishable from paint jobs produced by Pacmin, Atlantic, or Graphideco. For example, I would consider orange peel, paint bleeding underneath masking tape, and the characteristic step that results when you mask off a a cheatline....(When you peel the tape back, you can see a noticeable step in the paint layer ...Did I describe that well)?

      So, sure, I could use a 1 oz cup and replenish it...but it just doesn't sound right...

      Incidently, I saw this on graphideco's web site: http://www.graphideco.com/videopage

      You have to watch the whole thing, because I don't see any slide controls. Anyway, at the end, you will see some spray painting an ATR72 (I think)...and he is using what looks like a mini spray gun.

      I saw a picture of Pacmin with pretty much the same thing...they were spray painting a model with what looks like a mini spray gun....but I can't find the picture right now.

      I am not trying to argue for a mini spray gun or a paint brush; just trying to make the best decision I can , by giving you every thing I know and I have seen. You guys are the experts, not me...I'll take whatever advice I can get. I already received some great advice.

      It sounds like I should get a spray brush, have a bottle of paint in another jar, and replenish as necessary...but just wanted you to see this and see what you think.

      Thanks.

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      Post #65812, posted on 01-30-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Regarding air compressors, one of any size can be used if you have the right setup. When I was in school and still living with my folks, I used my dad's huge shop compressor all the time. My airbrush was connected to a regulator with a quick-disconnect attachment, and it plugged right into the compressor's air line. All I had to do was take the airbrush and regulator out to the shop, connect the line, and I could spray all day.

      The only time I would recommend a high-capacity spray gun would be if I was in the business of producing large models that required large areas of the same color - if, for instance, I built 1:72 submarines for a living. For model matters I would stick with a standard airbrush.

      Keep in mind, too, that quality of your finish will be a factor not only of the spray gun you use, but the paint you're using (enamel, lacquer, or acrylic), the air pressure, surface preparation, any topcoats you apply afterward, number of coats, and so forth. I've seen finishes on 1:144 models that looked identical to large-capacity spray gun finishes in terms of consistency and luster, and yet I knew they were done at a workbench with smaller tools. Often it's not so much the tools as the technique. It sounds like you may want to steal some techniques used in scale automotive modeling (which I dabble in, too).

      Regardless of everything else, though, good luck with your project.

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

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      pacmintrader


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      Post #65815, posted on 01-30-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi. Thanks for your last reply. I hear you. I know that surface preparation and technique are key to a good paint job, so guess what my next question(s) are?

      Just kidding.

      We can stop this thread...I have enough to go on as it relates to spray equipment. I don't which way I will go...but I will update you when I make up my mind and have something to show.

      I will take any more comments on this subject, but I probably need to move on to the subject of painting technique...so I will do some research on my own, then come back here if I can trouble you all for some questions that I might still have.

      Thank you everyone...very helpful. Hope to return the favor to someone else some day.

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      pacmintrader


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      Post #65825, posted on 01-30-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Hello DanaK,

      Apologies; I must have overlooked your response.

      "the single-action Paasche H model can be used with a large detachable spray bottle or a small paint cup. I've used my H, for over 40 years, for painting most of my 1/144, 1/100, and 1/72".

      I'm not really in the hobby (yet), so please excuse me for not knowing in advance. As you state, you are a professional model maker and you deal with models in the size category that I am restoring. Therefore, I think I should take your advice and try out the H model.

      I looked at the Paasche H model on various retailer sites and on Youtube. It seems to meet my criteria and more. As you stated, I can buy extra detachable, larger size bottles. They have 3oz. bottles. They also have 8oz, but those might be for storage only? It's also supposed to be easy to use and learn for beginners like myself, but still create great finishes. It's also inexpensive; readily available; easy to clean; and easy to source parts if necessary.

      (I am also taking the advice on the Preval system for larger projects around the house.)

      Thank you very much for responding, and sorry I did not catch it sooner.

      Everyone, thank you very much for responding. I received way more responses than I though I might. I was sort of having "writer's block" about this issue. I couldn't start my project(s) without knowing what equipment I might need.

      As I said before, my next task is to learn proper painting technique. I'm going to do some pretty cool paint jobs, so pretty excited now.

      Will post pix as soon as I can.

      Thanks again.

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      Post #65827, posted on 01-30-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      I've used rattle cans in the past on 1:72 707 fuselages that are about the same size, ditto an airbrush for the silver bellies. With the airbrush, you just refill the paint cup if it's lacquer, enamel you can usually do an entire cup with an ounce. If not, it's one refill, no biggie. Just start at one end and work your way to the other.

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      Post #65829, posted on 01-31-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Regarding techniques used by car modelers, look for a book titled "The Modeler's Guide to Scale Automotive Finishes" by Pat Covert, published by Kalmbach in 1997. There's a lot of ideas in that book that can easily be adapted to airliner finishes.

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.