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      Bill-ay


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      Post #65052, posted on 11-28-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi guys,

      I'm trying to finish up my Authentic Airliners A300-600 kit. The gear is very fragile and I suspect it will not hold up under the weight of the model if attached without reinforcing the strut. How do you guys normally go about reinforcing resin struts? The A300 strut is longer and thinner than some of the other airliners out there. Simply chop the resin strut and replace with a thin metal rod? The resin brakes that the strut sits on would still be under the pressure of the model anyways.

      Open for brainstorming. Thanks.

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      gavmh


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      Post #65053, posted on 11-29-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi Billy,

      Hopefully, I can offer metal MLGs for the Airbus kits soon. Presently, we are in the test phase.
      If you can wait a month or two, this could solve your problem.

      Kurt

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      Bill-ay


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      Post #65061, posted on 11-30-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      Thats excellent news Kurt. Will be buying replacement sets for all my kits when they become available.

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      Boeing797


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      Post #65062, posted on 11-30-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      Great Kurt!!!!!
      Will we get reinforced mlg for your other types like 747 SP or 744, too?
      Thanks Ortwin

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      RAA188


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      Post #65094, posted on 12-03-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      All-

      Both in the interim, and for other kits not so lucky as to have reinforced undercarriage:

      Fixing this takes patience, a steady hand, a vise, and a very good set of drill bits. Your best bet for gear like this is to clamp the strut into a properly aligned vise, and carefully drill out the center of the strut. Then slip in a wire (steel music wire is best, IMO, tho certainly brass and even alumin(i)um should work...) and tack it in with CA. If you're concerned about the horizontal beam that makes up a 4- or 6-wheel bogie, modify this first, then move on to the vertical.

      I've done this with decent success by getting the strut aligned properly both vertically & horizontally, then *VERY SLOWLY* feeding a drill bit down the center using a bit mounted in a slow-turning Dremel mounted in a Dremel-designed drill press. The wire was left standing proud at the top by a millimeter or so to both help locate the part and add surface area for gluing.

      Yes, it's a bear, but it's the best way I've found. As an aside, this recreates basically what you see in larger kits where there's a wire molded into the strut already (as on kits from Platz, Amodel, etc.).

      It's a bit of work, but well worth it, IMO.

      Rob in AK

      "I apologize sincerely, but this is not information that can be given to Americans." --In response to a question about the differences between the Il-86 and -96.

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      radioguy


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      Post #65097, posted on 12-03-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      Funny you should mention, Rob. Snapped the nose gear off an RV767-300 while still
      in the sanding stage..I HATE that design! So I did pretty much as you have described
      above...except freehand. To be fair, I use loops and a Dremel Flex-i-Shaft handle so
      I can really see what's going on and have better control with a less bulky tool.
      Yes, a steady set of hands helps a lot, too. Luckily, I haven't yet lost my touch
      ...yet.

      Alan Aronoff
      CYUL

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      RAA188


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      Post #65099, posted on 12-04-2016 GMT-5 hours    
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      radioguy :
      Funny you should mention, Rob. Snapped the nose gear off an RV767-300 while still
      in the sanding stage..I HATE that design!


      Yeah, that setup is common across a lot of kits, the C-135 and Heller 707 being particular beasts in larger scales, even the 1:72 DC-4/-6 kits and larger military birds like the B-1...I've broken many a C-135 strut long before finishing (let alone shipping) the model from having the "convenience" of the bay doors molded shut, giving me the sole option of installing the struts before finish work starts.

      As a side note, I've found that for kits like this it's often possible to either cut away one locator pin on a given side and glue after the fact, or actually install a wire in (and across) the gear bay and attach the strut to that--as in either glue one side directly or make a small groove in the crossbeam top and glue flat across to the wire--to avoid having to build things up beforehand. It still requires a bit of finesse, but the end result is far less painful than having a strut hanging down that has to be reattached (or worse still, repaired post-shipping...) after sanding, painting, etc.

      When I ship the larger 707 models I usually build them this way, with the gear separate and add it in after arrival. It's indistinguishable from the kit maker's method, and a whole lot simpler than fixing broken parts on arrival.

      Rob in AK

      "I apologize sincerely, but this is not information that can be given to Americans." --In response to a question about the differences between the Il-86 and -96.

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      Post #65101, posted on 12-04-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      I've been toying with your idea for some time. Makes sense.

      The couple of builds I've shipped have gone suspended in the
      box. I built up styrofoam blocks to support the model under
      the wings, fuselage, and horizontal stabs. Where possible,
      props go unattached in a separate container. Sent a 1/72
      Heller Connie to my buddy in Basel. He's connected with the
      SCFA who fly the Brietling Connie. A 1/144 MC T7-F went to
      an F/O friend who flies them for FedEx. He got Jenna...legs
      and all. No casualties on either project.

      Alan Aronoff
      CYUL

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      RAA188


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      Post #65103, posted on 12-04-2016 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      radioguy :
      The couple of builds I've shipped have gone suspended in the
      box. I built up styrofoam blocks to support the model under
      the wings, fuselage, and horizontal stabs. [..]
      He got Jenna...legs and all. No casualties on either project.


      Nice! I'm a huge fan of the foam block packing method, I'll buy a full-size sheet of blueboard as the builders call it (4'x8'x2" thick) and cut and tape it to shape to fit. I've had relatively few accidents along the way, but there's always the chance...Add in something with a fair number of dangly bits like a 707 and it's 4 nacelles and you get into the "cross-your-fingers" territory ;) I actually had one model shipped as baggage on my flight in a wooden crate with a large sticker plastered to the top asking the TSA to call me if it needed secondary screening so I could be there to (potentially) help re-pack it; it never got touched, and I never got a call...Perhaps that's using up some karma

      But as you said, it's often during the finishing that things get snagged and/or broken, and that's always my biggest worry, especially *after* the decals are on

      Rob in AK

      "I apologize sincerely, but this is not information that can be given to Americans." --In response to a question about the differences between the Il-86 and -96.

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      Post #66426, posted on 03-12-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      any updates Kurt?

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      gavmh


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      Post #66438, posted on 03-13-2017 GMT-5 hours    
      Yes, they are now in production and shall be available soon.

      Kurt